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Did road rage contribute to North Carolina I-40 truck crash?

If you get on Interstate 40 and drive west of Raleigh for about four hours, you will come to Buncombe County. The county is well-known as part of the Asheville metro area, but it’s also a scenic recreational area famous for the Blue Ridge Parkway and Pisgah National Forest.

A couple of days ago, a tractor-trailer crash took place on I-40 right at the southern edge of the national forest. A big rig headed east stalled as it was climbing a hill. The 18-wheeler then rolled backward, striking two other vehicles.

According to a news report, the drivers of the other vehicles were very fortunate. They were taken to a nearby hospital but their injuries were described as minor.

The 55-year-old truck driver was not injured in the wreck, but he was cited by the North Carolina State Highway Patrol with unsafe movement. The ticket is often given after a crash to drivers who law enforcement officers believe caused the accident with dangerous maneuvers.

As drivers familiar with manual transmissions know, vehicles can be stalled when climbing a hill when a driver shifts upwards too rapidly, thereby starving the engine of fuel.

Details in the article about the tractor-trailer crash are minimal, but we do know that in similar wrecks road rage is often a part of unsafe vehicle movements. Far too often, road rage involves much more than angry gestures – enraged drivers sometimes target other vehicles with dangerous driving methods that can lead to crashes, injuries and even deaths.

Experts say that the safest way to deal with possible road rage is to not engage the other driver, stay away and don’t stop.  

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