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Posts tagged "automobile collision"

Underinsured Motorist Insurance for NC Traffic Collision injuries

Underinsured Motorist Insurance for NC Traffic Collision injuries may provide coverage above the North Carolina minimum limits. In North Carolina the minimum insurance limit to drive is thirty thousand dollars per person.  If you have significant injuries or medical expenses that exceed one emergency room visit you may discover that if the defendant has minimum NC automobile insurance limits there may not be enough insurance available to compensate for your damages. Underinsured Motorist Insurance Underinsured Motorist Insurance is insurance above the minimum limits which pays for your compensatory damages when the defendant does not have enough insurance.  Underinsured Motorist Insurance can provide coverage in an amount between $50,000.00 and $1 million.  It is cheaper than liability insurance. You can arbitrate an underinsured motorist claim in NC.  Arbitration is an expedited type of trial to three attorneys rather than a jury.  It is typically cheaper, quicker and more reliable than some jury verdicts.  Finally, as resolving claims with your underinsured motorist carrier is your insurance, there is a first party duty of good faith, which requires your carrier to treat you correctly. If you have a significant claim that may result in a claim above the defendant's limits, call us to discuss what we can do to assist with your claim. what to do in an automobile collision Contact us to discuss your insurance coverage before your involved in an automobile collision or what we can do to assist with your case.

What to do after an Injury in a Car Crash in Eastern NC

Car Crash?  Injured?  Just not sure what to do next? Often our clients are just not sure what to do immediately after a car crash.  Injuries and emotions can get in the way of making good decisions.  Therefore, we have created a short check list for you.

Why you should hire a trial lawyer for your injury case

Why do you need a trial lawyer for your serious injury case? On September 13, 2013 I was invited to try a mock personal injury trial to a room of approximately 100 personal injury lawyers from all over North Carolina at the North Carolina Advocates for Justice office in Raleigh. During the trial attorneys from all stages of their practice, young and experienced alike, came forward to discuss how to handle issues in their cases. The experience was very uplifting and emotional for me as attorneys whom I have idolized, one I have known and admired since long before I became a lawyer, approached me to ask advice about how to protect their clients. Nothing builds your ego like a college asking your advice. Nothing destroys your ego like not having a good answer for that attorney. This fraternity of attorneys who try their client's cases to juries and invest emotionally and financially in their clients is a rare group. This same group of attorneys shares their collective knowledge on the premise that in helping a college to assist his/her client they raise the tide for all injured persons throughout north Carolina. Why you should hire a trial lawyer. Why hire a "trial" lawyer to assist in your claim? We have earned the title by winning and quite frankly loosing cases on behalf of our injured clients and have learned the true value of cases throughout North Carolina. Often in loosing a case for a deserving client, I have learned how to assist the next client, give better advice about settlement of cases and put my next client in a better position to recover for their injuries. Post settlement the medical bills, liens and costs must be accurately accounted for and properly negotiated to give our clients the best result. Whether you have a social security disability (SSI) claim, workers' compensation injury or a serious injury from an automobile collision - think about hiring a trial lawyer and putting that experience to work for you! Joe Tunstall

Social Media after a Car Accident or Personal Injury

Social Media after a Car Accident or Personal Injury?? Our clients rarely ask whether they should post to their social media (Facebook, twitter, Instagram, etc) after a car accident or injury case -- they just do.  Our society is obsessed with instantly sharing what we are doing, what is happening to us and how we are reacting to our own lives.  In the past year, our attorneys have seen a significant increase in requests in discovery (written requests called interrogatories, request for the production of documents and verbal requests at depositions) for logon information for our clients Social Media and requests that they produce the history of their account. Why would the insurance defense attorney (attorney hired by the defendant's insurance company to defend them) care if I have 500 friends on Facebook or 1,000 Twitter followers?  They don't.  What they are counting on is that many of us share a lot about our lives, but rarely do we share the really ugly parts of our own pain and the shame of having pain and problems following injuries from a collision or injury. Often the best advice is what my grandmother told me many times -- don't put anything in writing you don't want to explain to your grandmother.  That is especially true of pictures. Joe Tunstall, why use a trial lawyer After a car accident our clients may post a picture of their vehicle, but rarely do they feel compelled to place a picture of themselves with no shower, hair messy from lack of sleep due to pain, stressed and frustrated for all their friends, co-workers and family to see.  Instead they may post a picture of their next GOOD hair day.  Although there is nothing WRONG at all with wanting to show your good day, your best days, to family and friends -- the insurance company lawyers know that if a jury sees your smiling face at a birthday party two weeks after the car crash, despite the fact you were in pain when you went, left early after taking a pain pill and didn't sleep that night -- the picture of your smiling face is enough to expose to the jury that you are exaggerating.  When you have to explain all the good looking pictures, the only ones you would want to post, even when your in pain and having a tough time, it erodes the juries confidence in your complaints of pain. In Virginia an attorney who was past President of the Virginia Trial Lawyers Association was sanctioned for advising a client to remove damaging photos from his Facebook page after receiving a request from the insurance defense attorney to produce the same.  article.  An attorney cannot assist a client in removing or erasing discoverable material.  A client must have the good sense not to post pictures of themselves they would not want to discuss with a judge, jury or their own grandmother.  They must also understand that if they tell a jury about all the pain they had for six months in 2011 and the only pictures are of them smiling with their children at the park (good days) and not of them on the couch afterwards sleeping from the pain their credibility will be attacked. If you have questions regarding this post visit us at our own social media where we still only post the good days.  @ncpilawyer on twitter and O'Malley Tunstall Facebook on Facebook. O'Malley Tunstall, PLLC Raleigh office of O'Malley Tunstall, PLLC  

Health Insurance Through North Carolina State Employees BCBS? Your Personal Injury Attorney Cannot pay your PI monies without paying Health Plan

In an issue of first impression, the NC Court of Appeals recently ruled that the State Health Plan has a lien that must be paid out of any third party recovery and failure to so pay could result in the attorney having to personally reimburse the state. In other words, an injured party who has health insurance through the State of North Carolina as an employee of relative of a state employee must reimburse the Health Plan out of any injury claim and their attorney is charged by law with doing so.  Failure of the attorney in paying the lien could result in the attorney having to pay the money. In The NC Health Plan v. Barnett, NC COA12-999, the Court held, N.C. Gen. Stat. § 44-50 (2011), places an affirmative duty on an attorney for an injured party to retain the full amount of a medical provider's lien before disbursing settlement proceeds. NC Supreme Court has acknowledged that an attorney who violates this duty is subject to legal liability for the amount of the lien under the statute. N.C. Gen. Stat. § 135-45.15 similarly places a duty upon an injured party's attorney to direct settlement funds recovered by an injured State Health Plan member to plaintiff in satisfaction of its statutory lien. The attorney mistakenly argued that his client ordered that the funds be disbursed in that manner.  He cites North Carolina State Bar Ethics Opinion RPC 69, which states that "[a]lawyer is generally obliged . . . to disburse settlement proceeds in accordance with his client's instructions. The only exception to this rule arises when the medical provider has managed to perfect a valid physician's lien." North Carolina State Bar RPC 69 (October 20, 1989). This opinion by the State Bar does not excuse the attorney's actions.   Instead, the opinion clearly acknowledges that, regardless of a client's instructions, an attorney cannot ignore a valid statutory lien, a physician's lien under N.C. Gen. Stat. § 44-50. An attorney likewise cannot ignore a valid State Health Plan lien under N.C. Gen. Stat. § 135-45.15 when disbursing settlement funds, regardless of his client's wishes. The issues in lien disbursement have become unduly burdensome and difficult to properly follow.  You may be better off hiring an attorney to assist you as they are responsible for properly disbursing disbursing the money after you settle or win a judgment.  Call us today if you have any questions regarding your automobile injury claim. Personal Injury Attorney -- Joe Tunstall

Medicaid Liens in North Carolina Injury Cases -- U.S. Supreme Court rules

Very courageous attorneys from North Carolina at Kirby & Holt, L.L.P recently had a rare opportunity.  They were able to help shape the law across the country by challenging North Carolina's interpretation of medicaid reimbursement in accident and injury cases.  Their argument was that North Carolina's procedure was arbitrary and often hurt those needing help the most; children. In WOS v. EMA 568 U. S. ____ (2013) the court held; "The task of dividing a tort settlement is a familiar one. In a variety of settings, state and federal courts are called upon to separate lump-sum settlements or jury awards into categories to satisfy different claims to a portion of the moneys recovered.  Indeed, North Carolina itself uses a judicial allocation procedure to ascertain the portion of a settlement subject to subrogation in a workers' compensation suit. It instructs trial courts to "consider the anticipated amount of prospective compensation the employer or workers' compensation carrier is likely to pay to the employee in the future, the net recovery to plaintiff, the likelihood of the plaintiff prevailing at trial or on appeal, the need for finality in the litigation, and any other factors the court deems just and reasonable." N. C. Gen. Stat. Ann. §97- 10.2(j) (Lexis 2011). North Carolina would be on sounder footing had it adopted a similar procedure for allocating Medicaid beneficiaries' tort recoveries. It might also consider a different one along the lines of what other States have done in Medicaid reimbursement cases. The State thus has ample means available to allocate Medicaid beneficiaries' tort recoveries in an efficient manner that complies with federal law. Indeed, if States are concerned that case-by-case judicial allocations will prove unwieldy, they may even be able to adopt ex ante administrative criteria for allocating medical and nonmedical expenses, provided that these criteria are backed by evidence suggesting that they are likely to yield reasonable results in the mine run of cases. What they cannot do is what North Carolina did here: adopt an arbitrary, one-size-fits all allocation for all cases."  WOS v. EMA 568 U. S. ____ (2013) Any reader of our blog knows we constantly address the issues involved in how workers' compensation liens work within third party (accident and injury) cases. The Supreme Court continued; "North Carolina's statute, therefore, is pre-empted if, and insofar as, it would operate that way.And it is pre-empted for that reason. The defect in §108A-57 is that it sets forth no process for determining what portion of a beneficiary's tort recovery is attributable to medical expenses. Instead, North Carolina has picked an arbitrary number--one-third--and by statutory command labeled that portion of a beneficiary's tort recovery as representing payment for medical care. Pre-emption is not a matter of semantics. A State may not evade the pre-emptive force of federal law by resorting to creative statutory interpretation or description at odds with the statute's intended operation and effect." "North Carolina's argument, if accepted, would frustrate the Medicaid anti-lien provision in the context of tort recoveries. The argument lacks any limiting principle: If a State arbitrarily may designate one-third of any recovery as payment for medial expenses, there is no logical reason why it could not designate half, three-quarters, or all of a tort recovery in the same way."  WOS v. EMA 568 U. S. ____ (2013) Thanks to these courageous attorneys who have spend incalculable hours helping a client, a child and a state.    

Asked to be A Guardian Ad Litem for a child? You cannot be charged with the cost of a lost case

A Guardian Ad Litem cannot be charged with the cost of a lost case for the minor they represent. The North Carolina Court of appeals recently addressed the issue of taxing costs against a guardian ad litem appointed to represent a minor child in litigation.  First, a minor (someone under 18 years of age or an incompetent) cannot file a lawsuit on their own.  They are only allowed to do so through someone appointed as their guardian ad litem or guardian at law.  This used to be called the "next friend" doctrine and prevents someone under 18 from contracting or creating a situation that binds themselves. An easy example is when a child is seriously injured in an automobile collision, they must have a guardian ad litem file suit on their behalf for their harms and losses including lifetime injuries. In Stark v. Ford Motor Company, NO. COA09-286-2, the NC COA concluded that the taxing of costs against the guardian ad litem in the absence of a finding of bad faith was an abuse of discretion.  Essentially it would not be fair to require a minor child to find someone willing to take the risk of being charged personally with the costs of the court if they lost to file a lawsuit on their own behalf. More interestingly, in the Stark case, the court did not address the appropriateness of charging personally a minor child with the cost of the trial.  How can someone who cannot even file their own lawsuit be responsible for what their "next friend" or guardian ad litem decided to do when they were only 2 or 3 years of age? If you have any questions about recovering for your damages, either for yourself or a child here in North Carolina, feel free to contact our office.

Car Crash while Working? Workers Compensation Lien must be Paid

Car crash while working? You must pay Workers' Compensation back. One of the main reasons to hire an attorney familiar with both workers' compensation and personal injury (automobile accident and injury claims) is that you have options at the end of your claim as to what you must repay to workers' compensation out of your injury verdict or settlement. Personal injury, workers\' compensation attorney -- Joe Tunstall N.C. Gen. Stat. Ann. § 97-10.2 (j) states "Notwithstanding any other subsection in this section, in the event that a judgment is obtained by the employee in an action against a third party, or in the event that a settlement has been agreed upon by the employee and the third party, either party may apply to the resident superior court judge of the county in which the cause of action arose or where the injured employee resides, or to a presiding judge of either district, to determine the subrogation amount."  N.C. Gen. Stat. Ann. § 97-10.2 (West) Therefore, your attorney may find it appropriate to file a motion with the court asking the judge to set the amount of the recovery rather than merely repay the lien.  In the Leggett case, Joe Tunstall, filed a motion arguing why workers' compensation should recover none of the money from a client's serious injury.  The Court of Appeals agreed with the trial judge in allowing no recovery for the workers' compensation insurance company.   "N.C. Gen.Stat. § 97-10.2(j) grants the superior court discretion to determine the amount of the employer's lien when a settlement is reached between the injured employee and the third party tortfeasor. See id. The trial court may reduce or completely eliminate a workers' compensation lien if warranted by the facts, and this Court may not interfere absent an abuse of discretion."  Leggett v. AAA Cooper Transp., Inc., 198 N.C. App. 96, 100, 678 S.E.2d 757, 761 (2009). The Court of Appeals held that one reason for upholding the elimination of the lien was  "Plaintiff's evidence at the hearing included Plaintiff's testimony and eleven marked exhibits, including Plaintiff's medical records."  Leggett v. AAA Cooper Transp., Inc., 198 N.C. App. 96, 101, 678 S.E.2d 757, 761 (2009) N.C. Gen. Stat. Ann. § 97-10.2(j) further states "The judge shall consider the anticipated amount of prospective compensation the employer or workers' compensation carrier is likely to pay to the employee in the future, the net recovery to plaintiff, the likelihood of the plaintiff prevailing at trial or on appeal, the need for finality in the litigation, and any other factors the court deems just and reasonable, in determining the appropriate amount of the employer's lien."  N.C. Gen. Stat. Ann. § 97-10.2 (West). It is clearly not appropriate to file a 10.2(j) motion in every case with workers' compensation and liability proceeds.  The ability to know when to file the motion and when not to file the motion is why you pay an experienced attorney who handles these claims on a daily basis. If you have any questions regarding personal injury, automobile injury cases or how they affect your workers' compensation claim; feel free to contact our office.

Cross Examination in an automobile collision or personal injury trial

Learning to do a cross examination is like learning to do anything else; you must practice, make mistakes and then learn from those mistakes to correct and hone your craft. If you ask a practicing trial lawyer, most will agree that learning to do a good direct examination that appears like a conversation, elicits the necessary information and does not result in constant objections is more difficult to master than a laser cross examination, however, even when you muddle through a direct, rarely can you do significant harm to your case like a poor cross examination. Below find the rules I keep posted in my trial cheat notebook. 1. Laser focus your cross examination. 2. Lead the witness, cross examination is not a direct examination. 3. Always complete your question with a yes or no answer only. 4. Follow your own order. 5. Start with eliciting helpful information for your case. 6. Don't overreach. Cross Examination is not a direct examination where you attempt to obtain information by asking open ended questions that allows a witness to answer in sentence or paragraph form. A good cross examination is a laser focused examination of what a witness has already testified to that allows you to question, exacerbate or challenge already given testimony. The work mistake I have seen over the years by adverse counsel in their cross examinations of my clients involve forgetting the point of cross examination and turning their examination into a deposition of my client. Cross examination is not the time to learn information nor is it a time to obtain information about my client that you did not already know. The old adage "Never ask a question at trial you don't know the answer to" is imperative when you are attempting to question a hostile witness. If you ask an open ended question whereby you are attempting to elicit information, you give that person an opportunity to spin and frame their answer in such a way that negatively impacts upon your case, i.e. you are no longer doing your job. Cross examination, when done correctly, does not have to go on forever. In fact, if you look at the rules I use for my own cross examination, you will see I attempt to remind myself at every stage not to over embellish my cross examination. I have seen an expert derailed in a few short questions and seen trials turn with a one sentence cross. The second biggest mistake I have seen in cross examinations is to forget how to frame your questions. If you are representing someone in a courtroom than you have some advance notice of the facts of your case. The only real exceptions to this rule are prosecutors in criminal district court who have the unenviable task of framing their cross examination while an officer whispers the true facts of the case in their ear. That exception aside, we are paid to prepare our cases in advance of the hearing or trial. For cross examination that involves becoming familiar with all the facts of the case, pouring over each witnesses testimony or potential testimony if not prior deposition was given and then framing every question for that witnesses in such a way that they; a. give positive information that helps our case first, b. that we shape our other questions in such a way they can only give a yes or no answer, but the question itself suggests the answer or facts. For adverse witnesses you must lead them in the direction of the answer you want them to reach by the way you ask the question. You may interject your own beliefs, thoughts and especially interpretations of the facts as you ask your questions. You must always keep in mind your audience. In front of a judge in a bench trial I have a lot more latitude with cross but I don't need to exhaust a subject or emphasize a point the way I like to do with a jury. Often in a short cross examination I may pause after asking an important question for upwards of fifteen or twenty seconds while I look at either the witness or the jury. Fifteen or twenty seconds can seem an eternity, but not long enough to get a judge to make you move on. In an automobile collision case where a young twenty-two or three year old witness was testifying that his mother had the green light my cross was two questions. First, Mr. Taylor isn't it true that you were sitting in the backseat immediately behind the passenger seat as you approached the intersection. Second, I'm sorry you broke your arm from the impact of this collision; I'm assuming a good young man like you would never have made a claim against your own mother, you didn't did you. In that case I really never cared what Mr. Taylor had said about the light being green or red. He was in the backseat and I found it a little ridiculous the defense lawyer was allowing him to testify at all. There were several other witnesses that had already testified my client had the green light. The issue for that case was that there had not been enough impact to cause my client's back injuries. In fact, the pictures of the damage to my client's vehicle were less than impressive. Therefore, I simply wanted to use his testimony to bolster my client's claim that it was a significant impact despite the low visible damage between the vehicles. Getting in that he broke his arm without even having that the main focus of the question was a bonus. Second, in a very anti-lawsuit county, I wanted the jury to understand the son had made a claim for his own damages which had been paid by his own mother's insurance company. This was a gift from the other attorney to put this young man on the stand; I had to take advantage of it without looking like a jerk. Always make sure your questions on cross end with only a yes or no answer. It does you no good to frame your question in such a way that helps you only to leave the door open for a witness to be able to explain away the answer. Yes, a very well prepared witness can always answer with, yes or no and then explain, but rarely does that help them and instead it appears they are trying to talk their way out of the answer rather than giving a good answer. The old lawyer saying is three hours of preparation for every hour of trial is never as true as in cross examination. Spend your cross examination time drafting numerous statements you want the adverse witnesses to say and then turn them into questions. Isn't it true that... is an easy way to ask just about anything. Then don't forget to narrow down your list of questions into a few narrow but powerful statements. Cross is still a laser being used as a paintbrush. You're cutting away the previous testimony to get to the heart of your issue with the witness and leaving a visual image in the jurors' minds. The visual image you want the jury to remember about a witness often does not follow in the same order as direct. You should never start by apologizing to the jury or the witnesses for skipping around, just do it. If you follow the same order as the direct examination you make it easy for the jury but you don't paint the visual image you wanted to paint, instead your helping to paint the other sides visual. Start by eliciting anything helpful. Why, well if I attack you first are you more likely or unlikely to help me? You also should never forget the idea of primacy and recency. I like to start cross by pulling out any fact that could help support my client's version of events and finish with the most helpful negative statements about the witness. This is not set in stone. If the witness has made big points you may need to take those points, those swords used against your client and break them over your knee one at a time without regard for pulling any positive information from the witness, or finishing with an obvious point the witness must agree with that makes their previous point look ridiculous. Don't forget, cross examination is your friend, use it as a tool. You pick the order of questions that best helps your client's position. It is also okay to jump back and forth between two or more unrelated points if you can get concessions or admissions from the witnesses on those points. Learning when to stop a cross examination and when to just not cross examine a witness at all is all about experience. If there is nothing you can gain, no positive point to make or concession your sure to draw out, sometimes it is better not to ask anything. In a civil case often the defense not asking any questions of a lay witness is more powerful than asking if they are friends and if the witness will do anything for their friend. Those questions just aren't helpful as the jury can put themselves in the position of the person testifying for a friend and would be annoyed by the implication the witnesses would lie for a friend. This does not mean you simply don't cross a tough witness. Often young attorneys will not cross a witness if they are unsure how to handle the witnesses and it appears to the jury that the attorney is admitting or consciously agreeing with the testimony. Even if you ask one question and make a point, even a little point, it makes since to ask that question if the witnesses hurt you. Less is often more in cross examination. Don't overreach and try to make the knockout blow in one sentence. The witnesses may not agree that it was a hard impact that could have injured someone, but they may agree with you that several people complained of pain at the scene, that the vehicle was pushed sideways by the impact, that the suddenness of the impact scared them, and that the plaintiff was very nice at the scene. Cross examination can also be the death of a thousand small cuts. I have seen good attorneys cut apart a witness and never go head to head with them. Instead they took individual statements they have made and by getting the witnesses to agree to these statements, that on a whole make them look ridiculous, accomplish more than they could have by attacking them directly. After conducting hundreds of cross examinations in trials and hearings, one resource still stands out; The Art of Cross-Examination by Francis L. Wellman. This book sets out the true art that is involved in examine a witness. I believe this book is now on the fourth edition and it gives a look into the human mind and the way humans interact that explains why attacking someone head on is so difficult. I cannot recommend this book enough. After reading the original book, recommended by my senior partner when I first began practicing law, the idea of attacking a witness through small, organized statements that they must agree with without taking the witnesses statements head on first began to make sense. I have always kept the information learned in this book in the back of my mind as I prepared for more and more cross examinations. One example in the book discusses multiple witnesses to the same incident each having slightly different perspective and thus each remembering the incident differently. You cannot change what someone believes they saw, but you can certainly get them to agree to enough facts so that the jury understands how those similar facts make your client's version of events more credible. The book also talks about the honest vs. dishonest witness. It is almost impossible to truly cross examine the dishonest witness as they will not agree with the facts that are obvious and will continue to push their viewpoint rather than the truth. Remember cross examination should not be about taking a sledge hammer to concrete, but instead like using a laser to cut a distinct line through marble.

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